MonthApril 2016

Mongolia part 2 or “Chrysler? American? NIET!”

First of all let me go back to the facts. We are 500 km away from Ulaan Baatar in the middle of nowhere in Mongolia and we found a tarmac road. But there was a small problem… Ah right, the transmission of our Chrysler was broken.

As Klaus and I are both more the let’s try it and see if it still works type – partly because we or lets say I have no clue how I should tell a working transmission from a broken transmission otherwise, and partly because a long discussion on whether or whether not doesn’t really make a lot of sense a long road away from your next best option.

 

This is the moment of truth – when Bodo and Klaus tested the Chrysler (thanks to Bodo and Sören for the video – teamfritz2015.de)

So we started the car again – it worked. So far so good, then we tried to put the automatic transmission into D(rive) mode – yeah sounds not too good, but it worked. and we are moving. Hey maybe the transmission is not broke after a…. Ok it doesn’t shift from the first gear on to any other gear – but did I mention we were moving??

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Mongolia – adventure, disaster and everything in between

Mongolia – adventure, disaster and everything in between

Even before we started on our journey Mongolia was on our bucket list, OK to tell the truth more on Klaus’ bucket list than mine, but we are in it together and after all we had to enter China from Mongolia.

Some of you will remember that we started an indigogo campaign to get some funding due to our diminishing funds. With a lot of help from Brian – one of the Irish lads we met in Kazakhstan – we produced and small film and our campaign went online in Russia. We tried a lot to find sponsors but apart from some friends and family members (once again thank you to all those who helped – we wouldn’t be were we are today if not for you) there was little interest in helping us.

In Russia we also met Suzanne and John Curran a British couple with whom we should cross China, we accompanied them to the Russian – Mongolian border and wanted to say our goodbyes as we did not want to cross into Mongolia too earlier as we knew we would have to get a new visa for Russia if our campaign failed and we would have to go back home again. But already on our way to the border post Klaus and I were thinking the same thing – should we cross the border after all? And if we both think the same at the same time we tend to go with it – and as John put it “He who dares wins” – so in we went to Mongolia.

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Car size for an overlanding car

 

When planning an overlanding trip the question for the size of the car will come up,   if you don’t already own one.
For the moment I’m gonna leave technical details aside,  like 4×4 or not or which brand to use.
We started,  as you might know,  with our Chrysler Voyager GS.  Its the long wheelbase version and has 2.4 metres of space behind the seats to the back door.  So a bed fits in and quite some additional stuff, but we don’t have a high top roof.  Although the Chrysler is a great,  comfy ride and went through many adventures with us, we learned that we miss a space to stand up a lot. We underestemated that need completely.
The Chrysler without a high top roof is too small for staying for extended periods abroad (6+ month) . This is not a general rule, its just our opinion, because we know about people who stay in similar sized cars for years.  But they are more the exception,  then the rule.
Speaking from our experience a car like that with approx the same interior size is good for a trip for like 3-4 months maybe up to 6.

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