KategorieHints

7 simple energy saving tricks in an electricity powered camper

Englisch: Der Inhalt wird unten in einer verfügbaren Sprache angezeigt. Klicken Sie auf den Link, um die aktuelle Sprache zu ändern.

(I write this on my mobile, so there might be a fair amount of errors)

Foreword: To a person living a normal western live our live must sound archaic and I think it would have been strange for us as well, if we had been confronted with all changes at once. But we adopted slowly along the road and our western live style is several month and many kms away.
So what I want to say is that our live, which follows some energy saving measurements, doesn’t feel strange for us although its completely different to our former live with unlimited amounts of drinkable water from the tap and as much power as we needed.

We had some half-hearted energy saving things in our flat. But out here we only have so much energy available each day, so we need to save for the sake of our needs.

With a small completely electrical camper like ours and just 200 Watt solar power, energy saving is a must.

As you might know from earlier posts we wanted to be independent from other sources like diesel or gas, so that our basic energy needs are sorted, no matter what might happen.

Additionally to the solar system we have a loader which loads the batteries while driving but as we slowed down our pace to like 200-400km a week this just gives the batteries a push once in a while. And letting the car run idle costs quite some petrol and wears the car, which again costs money and effort.

Seiten: 1 2 3 4

Pages ( 1 of 4 ): 1 234Next »
sdfsdfsdfsdfsdf

Car size for an overlanding car

Englisch: Der Inhalt wird unten in einer verfügbaren Sprache angezeigt. Klicken Sie auf den Link, um die aktuelle Sprache zu ändern.

 

When planning an overlanding trip the question for the size of the car will come up,   if you don’t already own one.
For the moment I’m gonna leave technical details aside,  like 4×4 or not or which brand to use.
We started,  as you might know,  with our Chrysler Voyager GS.  Its the long wheelbase version and has 2.4 metres of space behind the seats to the back door.  So a bed fits in and quite some additional stuff, but we don’t have a high top roof.  Although the Chrysler is a great,  comfy ride and went through many adventures with us, we learned that we miss a space to stand up a lot. We underestemated that need completely.
The Chrysler without a high top roof is too small for staying for extended periods abroad (6+ month) . This is not a general rule, its just our opinion, because we know about people who stay in similar sized cars for years.  But they are more the exception,  then the rule.
Speaking from our experience a car like that with approx the same interior size is good for a trip for like 3-4 months maybe up to 6.

For everything longer then that, a high top roof is a real bliss. It doesn’t have to be full standing height,  but one should be able to stand  at least somewhat,  to undress,  and do many other things which can’t be done comfortably while sitting or lying  and you don’t want to do outside,  when being in a lively parking space in a town.

Seiten: 1 2 3 4 5 6

Pages ( 1 of 6 ): 1 23456Next »
sdfsdfsdfsdfsdf

Thailand: Save a lot of money at tourist attractions,ferries and more

Englisch: Der Inhalt wird unten in einer verfügbaren Sprache angezeigt. Klicken Sie auf den Link, um die aktuelle Sprache zu ändern.

Like nearly everywhere,  sightseeing is expensive and Thailand is no exception.  But there is a way to save a nice amount of money in Thailand for many things you need.  Tourist attractions,  ferries and much more.

While many touristic attractions cost around 500 Baht (12 Eur)  for foreigners,  they are a lot cheaper for Thai people,  mostly its 1\3 of the price.  Now you aren’t Thai, obviously –  but there is a way around that.
An official, aknowledged and for such purposes accepted document,  is a Thai driving license.  When you have one,  you pay less,  thats what expats told us.
Its a bit of a challenge to get one as there is quite some paperwork and preparation involved.  Thailand has a nice amount of burocrazy and stamps in many colors ,  but its not steep, at last.

The driving license is aknowledged and is the document you need to get the Thai price for things.
So if you plan an extended stay in Thailand or use it as your homebase around South East Asia,  it might be well worth a try to get one.

Andrea and me plan on getting one for our next stay around April.  So we will keep you posted about the proceedings

Seiten: 1 2

Pages ( 1 of 2 ): 1 2Next »
sdfsdfsdfsdfsdf

Travelling life, some things we learned

Englisch: Der Inhalt wird unten in einer verfügbaren Sprache angezeigt. Klicken Sie auf den Link, um die aktuelle Sprache zu ändern.

After travelling for a while the most noticeable change to ourselves is, that we live our life way more in the present then in the past or the future. And we learned to enjoy the moment and not worry too much what comes around the next corner, as it will come anyway.
On the road things can change quickly – the one moment its a smooth ride garnished with cool drinks on a sunny afternoon through a beautiful valley somewhere in SEA. The next moment the cooler or some other part decides to have had enough for the moment and you find yourselves trying to find a fix which brings you at least to the next town, while stopping every five km to refill the cooler and going with hazardous speed over a narrow mountain road to get somewhere before the water isn finally finished. Been there, done that.
Thinggs like that have happened so often to us, so we learned to enjoy what we have for the time being and not to worry about what may come and what has been or could have been done differently. It is ike it is. And this is a good lesson, I think.
And there is this whole rule and officials thing. At home, at least in Austria and Germany, there is a rule or a regulation for next to everything and there is mostly not much leeway in it, so you learn to adopt to the rules.
Starting with Russia, the world works differently. You know there is a rule, but you need of something somewhat more or something different, or the blue stamp on the green paper, knowing that the blue stamp can only go on the yellow paper. Things like that.
You learn that rules or regulations are just rough guidelines in most other parts of the world and that your real situation mostly depends on how much the official likes you or the way you explain things. In Thailand, for example, we needed a Visa extension. And the rule is that you only get an extension for the same amount of time as you got with your original visa.
As we had a visa on arrival and we are Austrians, this was only fourteen days but we didn’t ant to pay 1900 Baht per person for just 14 days more – we wanted 30 days. So we drove to a smaller immigration office near the cambodian border, wwhich is the first important thing. Go somewhere where it is less official and more liklely that rules can be beeded a little. And instead of asking for an extension we just went to the (very friendly) guy there and said with full confidence that we need a 30 day visa extension. Like its normal and we expect to get it. And guess what? It worked – 30 day extension checked. And the next time we do the same thing and if we don’t get a 30 day extension after the 14 day arrival visa we will point at the old extension and show that we got it last time, so why shouldn’T we this time? And guess what? It will work again – would surprise me a lot, if not.
There is a ton of examples for these everyday helpers and its the way the world works (outside Europe). And we like it 🙂 – small tricks that make the world go around.

Seiten: 1 2

Pages ( 1 of 2 ): 1 2Next »
sdfsdfsdfsdfsdf

Simple energy saving tricks in an electricity powered camper

Englisch: Der Inhalt wird unten in einer verfügbaren Sprache angezeigt. Klicken Sie auf den Link, um die aktuelle Sprache zu ändern.

(I write this on my mobile, so there might be a fair amount of errors)

Foreword: To a person living a normal western live our live must sound archaic and I think it would have been strange for us as well, if we had been confronted with all changes at once. But we adopted slowly along the road and our western live style is now 6 month and many kms away.
So what I want to say is that our live, which follows some energy saving measurements, doesn’t feel strange for us although its completely different to our former live with unlimited amounts of drinkable water from the tap and as much power as we needed. We had some half-hearted energy saving things in our flat. But out here we only have so much energy available each day, so we need to save for the sake of our needs.

With a small completely electrical camper like ours and just 200 Watt solar power, energy saving is a must.

As you might know from earlier posts we wanted to be independent from other sources like diesel or gas, so that our basic energy needs are sorted no matter what might happen.

Seiten: 1 2 3 4

Pages ( 1 of 4 ): 1 234Next »
sdfsdfsdfsdfsdf